First “Sea Trials”!

There are a few important details that still need to be added to the boat, like a dashboard, motorboard, decks, etc., not to mention a motor and steering wheel! But suddenly the light at the end of the tunnel really seems to be approaching.

The next step is to complete all the framing for the raised deck on the bow of the boat, called the cowl. First step was to install the cowl cleats to the coaming. Once the cowl cleats were in, I added the dashboard. Finally, a bit of framing called the strongback was added, which runs from the center of the dashboard to the center of the bow of the boat. The front end is now completely framed!

Gluing the cowl cleats to the coaming

Gluing the cowl cleats to the coaming

Attaching the dashboard and the strongback

Attaching the dashboard and the strongback

Next, it was time to move to the stern. One of the first parts that I assembled was the motorboard, and now it was finally time to install it. Motorboard assembly was pretty easy, except it was a bit difficult to figure out enough places to put clamps. Breaking the assembly into steps solved that problem, first the motorboard, then all the associated framing. As you can see, the amount of framing is fairly substantial, as the motorboard is put under quite a bit of stress.

Attaching the motorboard, rear view

Attaching the motorboard, rear view

Attaching the motorboard, top view

Attaching the motorboard, top view

Framing complete!

Framing complete!

Once the motorboard was installed, framing of the boat was essentially complete. All that is left is to add the decking. But, before doing that, I wanted to put the boat in water and look for leaks, while access to the interior of the boat was still easy. So, with friends in town, I took the opportunity to float the boat in the pool. Even Roscoe got in on the action!

As you can see, it is going to be a very cozy single-seater! And, it will need a lightweight motor to complement the heavyweight driver. But, trust me, I am not planning to enter any races…

In the boat, with 100 pounds of weights in the back, simulating the motor

In the boat, with 100 pounds of weights in the back, simulating the motor

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s